New article published on social media and sousveillance

I have a new article in the journal First Monday out today. Entitled ‘PSNIRA vs. peaceful protesters? YouTube, ‘sousveillance’ and the policing of the union flag protests,’ it explores how Youtubers responded to footage of alleged police brutality during the union flag protests in Northern Ireland between December 2012 and March 2013. 

Drawing on a qualitative analysis of 1,586 comments posted under 36 ‘sousveillance’ videos, I argue that responses to these videos were shaped by competing narratives on the legitimacy of police actions during the flag protests. This footage focussed attention on the anti-social behaviour of the protesters rather than the alleged police brutality referred to in the video descriptions. The paper concludes by considering the problematic nature of exploring imagined sousveillance, as was the case here, through the collection and analysis of ‘easy data’ scraped from online platforms such as YouTube. The paper can be accessed here

LSE British Politics and Policy blogpost on YouTube, sousveillance and protests in Northern Ireland

I have written an article for the LSE British Politics and Policy blog, which examines how social media was used to share footage of alleged Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) brutality against loyalists in Northern Ireland. This post highlights some of the findings from my British Academy funded project ‘YouTube, sousveillance and the policing of union flag protests in Northern Ireland, British Academy’ (Grant reference: SG132416). It can be accessed here

New essay in Book of Blogs

I have just had an essay entitled “The Battle of Stokes Croft on YouTube: The ethical challenges associated with the study of online comments” published in a ‘Book of Blogs.’

More details on the Book of Blogs (published by NatCen in conjunction with SAGE) can be found below:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Social-Media-Research-Blurring-Boundaries-ebook/dp/B00OYBUOCA

An earlier version of this essay can be found here

Presentation at ‘Scoping Questions of Privacy, Surveillance and Governance in the Digital Society,’

Yesterday I spoke at an event at the University of Sheffield focussing on questions of privacy, surveillance and governance in the Digital Society My presentation is below:

Other speakers at the event included Professor Clive Norris (Sheffield), Professor Kirstie Ball (Open University), Dr Andrew McStay (Bangor) and Dr Vian Bakir (Bangor). Thanks to John Steele and Jo Bates for the invitation and for organising an extremely interesting day – hopefully more to come!

New British Academy project on YouTube, sousveillance and the policing of flag protests in Northern Ireland

My British Academy funded project entitled YouTube, sousveillance, and the policing of flag protests in Northern Ireland’ will start early next month. I will be recruiting two research assistants to work on the project over the next few months (I will post details of these posts in July).

8552936656_00a45a6502_b

The University of Leicester has issued a press release about the project:

http://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/press/press-releases/2014/may/youtube-footage-of-northern-irish-protests-to-be-explored

If you have any questions about the project please feel free to contact me via email (pr93@le.ac.uk)

 

PSA Blog on ethical challenges associated with study of online comments

I have written a blogpost on the ethical stance I developed for my study of YouTube, sousveillance and the Stokes Croft riot. It can be accessed on the Political Studies Association site here: http://www.psa.ac.uk/insight-plus/blog/battle-stokes-croft-youtube-ethical-challenges-associated-study-online-comments