Paper presented at Transition V: Developing Dialogic Communication conference, Bucharest

This morning my Research Associate Giuliana Tiripelli will present our paper “Challenges and opportunities of dialogic communication in crisis situations: Twitter, affective publics and the 2015 Channel Tunnel fire” at the Understanding Transition V: Developing Dialogic Communication conference at the University of Bucharest. The abstract for the paper can be found below:

Challenges and opportunities of dialogic communication in crisis situations: Twitter, affective publics, and the 2015 Channel Tunnel Fire.

Giuliana Tiripelli & Paul Reilly

 

 

The ‘ambient storytelling infrastructure’ of Twitter today enables ‘affective publics’ to present their own perspectives on events and issues (Papacharissi, 2015). This phenomenon challenges established top-down communicative dynamics, in which definitional power appeared to lie with institutions, organisations, and journalists rather than citizens, and seemingly presents new opportunities for dialogic communication between these actors in the digital age. At the same time, ‘affective publics’ “are mobilized … through expressions of sentiment” (Papacharissi, 2016: 311), creating new information flows that challenge the ability of organisations and journalists to channel communicative resources that manage public responses to crises. This paper explores this binary role of ‘affective publics’ in contemporary media ecologies through the study of the Twitter debate that emerged during the Channel Tunnel Fire. The incident on 17th January 2015, during which a lorry was set alight by an electricity bolt from overhead power lines, led to the evacuation of the passengers and significant disruption to Eurostar services for the next few days. Specifically, the study analyses the role played by journalists and Eurostar staff in the co-construction of meaning of the incident. A critical thematic analysis was conducted (Braun and Clarke 2006) to explore key themes of the 12,652 English-language tweets posted between the 17th and 19th January 2015. URL links shared in tweets were also classified using an inductively-developed content analysis codebook. Results indicate that Twitter accounts belonging to members of the public, rather than the affected organisation (Eurostar) or emergency institutions, were primarily responsible for starting information flows about the Channel Tunnel fire and subsequent disruptions. Although many tweets expressed gratitude for the professionalism of the company and their prompt reply to customer queries, the study suggested an ‘imbalance’ between organisations and private citizens in the co-creation of meaning of the incident in favour of the latter. One interpretation of this finding was that it was a manifestation of the increasingly important role played by flexible and mobile affective publics in defining news events within the contemporary ecology, often at the expense of less flexible news organisations and political institutions that operate in these online spaces. This may present practical problems for emergency managers during incidents such as the Channel Tunnel fire, especially when the cacophony of views on Twitter make it difficult to both filter and share real-time crisis information on the microblogging site. In this way, the paper adds to the emergent literature on dialogic communication and disasters by considering the extent to which the mobilisation of affective publics online challenges the ability of emergency managers to share accurate real-time information with members of the public during such incidents.

Braun V and Clarke V (2006) Using thematic analysis in psychology. Qualitative Research in Psychology 3(2):77-101.

Papacharissi Z (2015) Affective publics: Sentiment, technology and politics. Oxford University Press.

Papacharissi Z (2016) Affective publics and structures of storytelling: sentiment, events and mediality. Information, Communication & Society 19(3):307-324.

ESRC Funded PhD Studentship on social media and disaster resilience

Dr Tina McGuinness (Management) and I are looking for applications for an ESRC PhD studentship, entitled “social media and community resilience: a process based study of South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Services.” Funded by the White Rose Doctoral Training Partnership Collaborative award, the successful applicant will work with SYFR to evaluate how sites such as Facebook and Twitter can be used to promote community disaster resilience and encourage citizens to fully participate in disaster risk management and reduction initiatives. Further details on the studentship can be found here and the closing date for applications is 20 March 2017.

Submission to UK Government Inquiry on children and young people’s mental health

I am pleased to report that our written submission to the UK Government inquiry on children and young people’s mental health has been accepted and published. Based on the findings from our Wellcome Trust project, our report addresses the role of social media in raising awareness of mental health issues amongst these groups. Thanks to my co-authors Michelle O’Reilly, Nisha Dogra, Natasha Whiteman and Jason Hughes for their hard work on this.

The submission can be viewed here

 

 

Invited presentation at Ulster University

This afternoon (3rd June) I will be an invited participant in a symposium entitled Social Media and Politics, to be held at Ulster University.

My slides can be found here and the abstract for my paper is below:

YouTube, sousveillance and the policing of the 2013 union flag protests in Northern Ireland

On December 3 2012, Belfast City Council voted to fly the union flag above City Hall on a number of designated days each year. In nearby East Belfast, the moderate pro-union Alliance Party was the subject of a controversial leafleting campaign, which suggested that they were responsible for this change to the previous policy of flying the flag 365 days a year and urged Loyalists to protest against the decision. The perception that the Alliance Party had sided with Sinn Fein during the controversial council vote led to Loyalist protests outside the offices of their councilors, and a series of death threats were issued to Alliance representatives such as MP for East Belfast, Naomi Long. The Ulster People’s Forum, led by North Down activist Jamie Bryson and the South Armagh victims’ campaigner Willie Frazer, was linked to a series of flag protests that disrupted rush hour traffic for short periods in towns and cities across Northern Ireland. While the majority of these protests passed off without incident, the first few weeks of 2013 saw the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) come under sustained attack from rioters in the Short Strand/Lower Newtownards Road area of East Belfast on a nightly basis.
Many of these protests were organised on Facebook pages such as Save Our Union Flag, which have functioned as spaces in which members of the Protestant Unionist Loyalist (PUL) tradition not only share information on upcoming demonstrations but also discuss related issues such as effectiveness of the strategy advocated by the Ulster People’s Forum. This paper focuses on audience responses to sousveillance (‘inverse surveillance’) footage shared on YouTube, which focused on incidents in which the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) was alleged to have been heavy-handed in their policing of the protests. It will add to the debate over how social media may be used to transmit citizen perspectives on civil unrest by reviewing the relevant literature on sousveillance and presenting the findings from a thematic analysis of 1146 comments posted in response to the four-most commented upon videos showing alleged PSNI brutality against the flag protesters. Results indicate that there was little rational debate about the events captured on camera or the controversial decision to alter the protocol on the flying of the union flag over Belfast City Council. Very few commentators perceived this footage as a form of sousveillance with many criticizing the behaviour of the protesters rather than the PSNI. In this way, the mainstream media narratives on the flag protests appeared to be reproduced by these commentators.

 

 

Press release for new Wellcome Trust project

I am a co-Investigator on a new Wellcome Trust project that will explore how adolescents use social media to seek out information relating to their mental health wellbeing. The project is led by Dr Michelle O’Reilly and the interdisciplinary team includes Dr Natasha Whitman, Professor Jason Hughes, Professor Panos Vostanis and Professor Nisha Dogra (all from the University of Leicester).

Further details on the project can be found here

New article in Case Studies in Fire Safety

Enrico Ronchi (Lund University), Francisco Nieto Uriz (Lund University), Xavier Criel (Safety Centre Europe) and I have published a paper on the modelling of large-scale evacuation of music festivals in the journal Case Studies in Fire Safety. This is one of the first papers from our EC FP7 funded project CascEff to be published.

The full citation for the paper is:

Ronchi E, Nieto Uriz F, Criel X, Reilly P. (2016) Modelling large-scale evacuation of music festivals. Case Studies in Fire Safety. 5:11-19, DOI: 10.1016/j.csfs.2015.12.002.

It can be downloaded (open access) here

 

New article with Filippo Trevisan published in Information, Communication & Society

Filippo Trevisan (American University) and I have an article, entitled “Researching protest on Facebook: developing an ethical stance for the study of Northern Irish flag protest pages” published in a special issue of Information, Communication & Society today.

The article can be accessed here

BBC Radio Leicester interview on role of social media in UK election

I was interviewed for a short piece on the role of social media in the forthcoming UK General Election, which featured on the BBC Radio Leicester breakfast show with Jim Davis and Jo Hayward this morning.

The segment can be found here (about the 1 hour 10 minutes mark)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02md2mm

The segment also featured in Jonathan Lampon’s mid-morning show (guess hosted by Ben Jackson).

It can be found here (about the 14 minute mark):

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02md2n6

Slides for presentation at Social Media and Risk Management workshop

This afternoon I will be presenting a paper on the role of social media by citizens and the emergency services during the 2014 UK floods. This will draw on interviews conducted as part of the CascEff project.

The workshop, organised by the Association française pour la prévention des catastrophes naturals (AFPN), focuses on Social Media and Risk Management is taking place in Noisy Champs, Paris.

The slides for my presentation can be found here