Social Media & Society conference #SMSociety

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Dr Suay Ozkula and I are at the 10th annual Social Media & Society conference in Toronto this weekend. We are presenting three papers today (20th July) which address issues pertinent to the conference’s theme ‘Rethinking Privacy & Trust in the Social Media Age’.

The first paper, entitled ‘Whose data is it anyway? Doing ethical social media research in the age of datafication ‘, examines the responsibilities of researchers to social media users who themselves are the subject of mass surveillance conducted by online platforms. We draw on the key guidelines for internet research since 2002 in order to critique the two most commonly proposed solutions to these issues, namely informed consent and de-identification. Data from Eurobarometer and the Pew Internet and American Life project is used to examine the growth in digital resignation amongst users, as well as their expectations in relation to academic use of their data. We conclude with a number of propositions for social media researchers, which include the principle that all research of online platforms be considered human participant research and that all ethical stances be produced on a case-by-case basis. We argue that researchers have an obligation to turn these data subjects into ‘knowing publics’ by making their methods for collecting and analysing data more transparency. They should also engage unaware participants, especially those from whom consent has not been obtained, throughout each stage of the project lifecycle.

The second paper is called ‘Strategic techniques for qualitative Sampling online- a review of social media monitoring tools’. It examines whether tools such as Google Trends and Hashtagify can be used to identify qualitative case studies that are meaningful and broadly representative of broader social phenomena. We discuss relevant issues such as digital bias in our review of how digital methods can be deployed in support of qualitative research. The paper argues that these tools have great potential in finding suitable entry points for researchers exploring societal issues on platforms such as Twitter. They can help identify key influencers and metadata that builds a more nuanced picture of how information flows on social media. However, the black box nature of these tools needs to be acknowledged as a limitation of digital methods. We propose that researchers should triangulate these results by using more than one monitoring tool in their construction of social media data samples.

We are also delivering a poster entitled ‘Easy data, usual suspects, same old places? A systematic review of digital activism research, 1995-2019′. This summarises our ongoing work examining the methods and case studies used in this emergent field. We find evidence to suggest that Twitter was by far the most researched platform during this period, with the Global South neglected in this work. We also explore the researchers and journals that are disproportionately represented in this body of research.

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New article with Filippo Trevisan published in Information, Communication & Society

Filippo Trevisan (American University) and I have an article, entitled “Researching protest on Facebook: developing an ethical stance for the study of Northern Irish flag protest pages” published in a special issue of Information, Communication & Society today.

The article can be accessed here

New essay in Book of Blogs

I have just had an essay entitled “The Battle of Stokes Croft on YouTube: The ethical challenges associated with the study of online comments” published in a ‘Book of Blogs.’

More details on the Book of Blogs (published by NatCen in conjunction with SAGE) can be found below:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Social-Media-Research-Blurring-Boundaries-ebook/dp/B00OYBUOCA

An earlier version of this essay can be found here

Presentation at ‘Scoping Questions of Privacy, Surveillance and Governance in the Digital Society,’

Yesterday I spoke at an event at the University of Sheffield focussing on questions of privacy, surveillance and governance in the Digital Society My presentation is below:

Other speakers at the event included Professor Clive Norris (Sheffield), Professor Kirstie Ball (Open University), Dr Andrew McStay (Bangor) and Dr Vian Bakir (Bangor). Thanks to John Steele and Jo Bates for the invitation and for organising an extremely interesting day – hopefully more to come!

New article published in SAGE Research Methods Cases: Ethical approaches towards study of YouTube comments

My article ‘The ‘Battle of Stokes Croft: The Development of an ethical stance towards the study of online comments’ has recently been published in SAGE Research Methods Cases.

The article can be accessed here: http://srmo.sagepub.com/view/methods-case-studies-2013/n89.xml . If you cannot access this content please drop me an email (pr93@le.ac.uk) for a preprint copy.

PSA Blog on ethical challenges associated with study of online comments

I have written a blogpost on the ethical stance I developed for my study of YouTube, sousveillance and the Stokes Croft riot. It can be accessed on the Political Studies Association site here: http://www.psa.ac.uk/insight-plus/blog/battle-stokes-croft-youtube-ethical-challenges-associated-study-online-comments

Paper published in Information, Communication & Society

Filippo Trevisan and I have had our paper ‘Ethical Dilemmas in Researching Social Media Campaigns on Sensitive Personal Issues: Lessons from the Study of British Disability Dissent Networks’ published in Information, Communication & Society.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1369118X.2014.889188#.U1TzlF788_s

I will upload a preprint copy of the paper to the Publications section of this site in due course.