About Paul Reilly

Digital politics scholar studying N.Irish online communities, online research ethics, social media and sousveillance. Views are my own.

Curator of National Teaching Repository

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I am delighted to announce that the National Teaching Forum launches this week. Funded by Advance HE, the NTR is an open-access online database where educators can share resources, ideas, and examples of best practice in teaching.

Supported by my Sheffield colleagues Xin Zhao and Paul Fenn, I will be the curator of the ICTs and intercultural learning section. We are looking for presentations, research papers, infographics, data visualisations and any other examples of how educators use ICTs to improve classroom engagement and educational outcomes of international students.

Information on how to submit your work to the NTR can be found here

Many thanks to the fantastic Dawne Irving-Bell for bringing this all together and for the opportunity to participate in what should be an excellent repository of resources for all educators.

 

 

BBC Hereford & Worcs interview on Russian disinformation on social media

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This morning I was interviewed by Elliot Webb on BBC Hereford & Worcester’s Breakfast show. We discussed the impact of Russian disinformation campaigns on social mediaand whether the UK government needs to do more to regulate online platforms in light of the findings from the Russia report.

Many thanks to Elliot, Toni and the team. The interview can be listened to here

Decentered Media Podcast on Lockdown Communication

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Yesterday I was in conversation with Rob Watson for the Decentered Media Podcast. We discussed what lessons we can learn from the public health communication campaigns during the pandemic, the future of local journalism, and the ways in which communities can be empowered during future crises. Many thanks to Rob for the opportunity.

The podcast can be accessed here 

 

 

Book chapter on Digital media and disinformation in Northern Ireland

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Delighted to receive my copy of Disinformation and Digital Media as a challenge for Democracy this morning. My chapter ‘Digital Disinformation in a deeply divided society: reflections from Northern Ireland” draws on myresearch over two decades on how digital media is used to frame contentious politics in Northern Ireland. I argue that digital disinformation around contentious episodes are likely to thrive due to the failure of political elites to address conflict-legacy issues. I argue that the current genre of information disorders have much in common with the propaganda deployed by both elite and non-elite actors during the conflict.

The book can be purchased here.

Many thanks to Georgios Terzis, Dariusz Kloza, Elzbieta Kuzelewska, Daniel Trottier for editing this excellent contribution to an important field. 

 

 

 

Supervising PhD post on importance of supervisors being kind to PGRs

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I have written a short blog for Supervising PGRs on the challenges of supervising PhD researchers during the pandemic. The key takeaway is the need for supervisors to be kind, supportive and responsive to PGRs during a time in which we are all experiencing stress and anxiety. Many thanks to Kay Guccione  for the opportunity. Please do check out her other work on mentoring, which i have found incredibly helpful in the past.

The post can be read here

BBC Radio Suffolk interview

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Yesterday I was interviewed byJames Hazell on BBC Radio Suffolk about the recent Reuters Digital News Report showing that Instagram is a key news source for young people We spoke about a range of issues, including the problem of misinformation on social media and the context collapse that people experience using online platforms. Many thanks to James and the team for the opportunity.

The interview can be accessed here

Article on photojournalism published on LSE American Politics and Policy blog

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Delighted to publish a blogpost with addressing the recent police attacks on photojournalists during the Black Lives Matter protests in the US. Based on a study of Greek photojournalists conducted with Anastasia Veneti and Darren Lilleker (Bournemouth University), we assess the implications of these attacks for press freedom in the US. The post can be read here

Post on social media sousveillance

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I have written a post for Human: Putting the Social into Science on the social media sousveillance footage recorded during the Black Lives Matter protests across the world. I argue that although this footage may not guarantee the conviction of the officers responsible caught on camera attacking protesters, it clearly provides a focal point for the broad coalition of protesters mobilised in anger at the police killing of George Floyd. Thanks to Laura Lightfinch, Sophie Armour and Victoria Wood for their help with this. The piece can be read here

BBC News Arabic media appearance

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Yesterday I was interviewed on the BBC Arabic news channel about the letter written to Facebook by scientists funded by the Chan-Zuckerberg Initiativein protest at the platform’s refusal to remove tweets from US President Donald Trump. Many thanks to George, Marwa and the BBC Arabic team for the invitation. A recording of the interview can be found here

BBC media appearances

Yesterday I made two appearances on the BBC talking about Twitter’s decision to classify two tweets by Donald Trump as unsubstantiated. First, I spoke to Joanna Gosling on the BBC News Channel about the implications of this action for the forthcoming US Presidential Election. The interview can be watched below.

I then spoke to Dean McLaughlin on BBC Radio Foyle‘s News at One show about whether this would this would lead to politicians being more careful about what they posted online. This interview can be found here

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Thanks to Dean, Joanna and their respective teams for the opportunity.