Two papers presented at IAMCR 2016

Over the weekend, I presented two papers at the International Association of Media and Communication Research conference at the University of Leicester. It was great to catch up with so many friends at the conference and the feedback on both papers was very useful. The details of both presentations can be found below:

Reilly, P. (2016) Participatory Media and Peacebuilding in Northern Ireland: Lessons from the 2014 Ardoyne parade dispute in Belfast,  Memory, Commemoration and Communication: Looking Back, Looking Forward, International Association of Media and Communication Research, Leicester, UK, 27-31 July.

Atanasova, D and Reilly, P. (2016) Affective publics and the 2015 Channel Tunnel Fire, Memory, Commemoration and Communication: Looking Back, Looking Forward, International Association of Media and Communication Research, Leicester, UK, 27-31 July.

Invited presentation at Ulster University

This afternoon (3rd June) I will be an invited participant in a symposium entitled Social Media and Politics, to be held at Ulster University.

My slides can be found here and the abstract for my paper is below:

YouTube, sousveillance and the policing of the 2013 union flag protests in Northern Ireland

On December 3 2012, Belfast City Council voted to fly the union flag above City Hall on a number of designated days each year. In nearby East Belfast, the moderate pro-union Alliance Party was the subject of a controversial leafleting campaign, which suggested that they were responsible for this change to the previous policy of flying the flag 365 days a year and urged Loyalists to protest against the decision. The perception that the Alliance Party had sided with Sinn Fein during the controversial council vote led to Loyalist protests outside the offices of their councilors, and a series of death threats were issued to Alliance representatives such as MP for East Belfast, Naomi Long. The Ulster People’s Forum, led by North Down activist Jamie Bryson and the South Armagh victims’ campaigner Willie Frazer, was linked to a series of flag protests that disrupted rush hour traffic for short periods in towns and cities across Northern Ireland. While the majority of these protests passed off without incident, the first few weeks of 2013 saw the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) come under sustained attack from rioters in the Short Strand/Lower Newtownards Road area of East Belfast on a nightly basis.
Many of these protests were organised on Facebook pages such as Save Our Union Flag, which have functioned as spaces in which members of the Protestant Unionist Loyalist (PUL) tradition not only share information on upcoming demonstrations but also discuss related issues such as effectiveness of the strategy advocated by the Ulster People’s Forum. This paper focuses on audience responses to sousveillance (‘inverse surveillance’) footage shared on YouTube, which focused on incidents in which the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) was alleged to have been heavy-handed in their policing of the protests. It will add to the debate over how social media may be used to transmit citizen perspectives on civil unrest by reviewing the relevant literature on sousveillance and presenting the findings from a thematic analysis of 1146 comments posted in response to the four-most commented upon videos showing alleged PSNI brutality against the flag protesters. Results indicate that there was little rational debate about the events captured on camera or the controversial decision to alter the protocol on the flying of the union flag over Belfast City Council. Very few commentators perceived this footage as a form of sousveillance with many criticizing the behaviour of the protesters rather than the PSNI. In this way, the mainstream media narratives on the flag protests appeared to be reproduced by these commentators.

 

 

Press release for new Wellcome Trust project

I am a co-Investigator on a new Wellcome Trust project that will explore how adolescents use social media to seek out information relating to their mental health wellbeing. The project is led by Dr Michelle O’Reilly and the interdisciplinary team includes Dr Natasha Whitman, Professor Jason Hughes, Professor Panos Vostanis and Professor Nisha Dogra (all from the University of Leicester).

Further details on the project can be found here

PhD student success

My two Leicester PhD students, Rahma Abdullah (co-supervised with Anders Hansen) and Faith Kibere (co-supervised with Peter Lunt) recently passed their PhD vivas with minor amendments. Rahma’s thesis focused on the construction of environmental issues in the Omani news media and Faith’s addressed the use of ICTs for development in the Kibera slum in Kenya.

Many congratulations to Drs Abdullah and Kibere for their success- it has been a pleasure to have worked with you both on your projects.

Job: Full-Time Research Associate, IMPROVER (3 days left to apply)

I am currently looking for a full-time Research Associate (fixed term for 22 months, with a provisional start date of 1st April 2016 subject to negotiation) for my EC Horizon 2020 project IMPROVER: Improved risk evaluation and implementation of resilience concepts to critical infrastructure.’ The closing date for applications is 10 March 2016 and further details on the role can be found here

If you have any questions about the role please contact me at: P.J.Reilly@sheffield.ac.uk

Job: Full-Time Research Associate for Horizon 2020 project IMPROVER

I am currently looking for a full-time Research Associate (fixed term for 22 months, with a provisional start date of 1st April 2016 subject to negotiation) for my EC Horizon 2020 project IMPROVER: Improved risk evaluation and implementation of resilience concepts to critical infrastructure.’ The closing date for applications is 10 March 2016 and further details on the role can be found here

If you have any questions about the role please contact me at: P.J.Reilly@sheffield.ac.uk

Job: Full-time Research Associate for Horizon 2020 Project

I am currently looking for a full-time Research Associate (fixed term for 22 months, with a provisional start date of 1st April 2016 subject to negotiation) for my EC Horizon 2020 project IMPROVER: Improved risk evaluation and implementation of resilience concepts to critical infrastructure.’ The closing date for applications is 10 March 2016 and further details on the role can be found here

If you have any questions about the role please contact me at: P.J.Reilly@sheffield.ac.uk