Blogpost on Kingsmill video row published on Democratic Audit

I have published a piece for Democratic Audit UK on the role of social media in the Kingsmill bread video row, which culminated in the resignation of Sinn Fein MP Barry McElduff last week.  I argue that this incident illustrates how hybrid media logics operate in Northern Ireland, with professional journalists increasingly using social media such as Twitter not only to source stories, but also to hold politicians to account for what they post online. The post can be found here

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Presenting two papers at MeCCSA 2018

This week I will be presenting two papers at the MeCCSA conference , which will be held at London South Bank University (10-12 January). The first one builds on my research on social media and contentious politics in Northern Ireland, with the second based on data collected as part of the Horizon 2020 project IMPROVER.

The programme for the conference can be found here and the abstracts of my two talks can be found below:

1)Reilly, P. Loyalists against Democracy: Assessing the role of social media parody accounts in contentious Northern Irish politics

Abstract:

Parody accounts on social media have emerged as one of the key focal points for the debate of contentious political issues in Northern Ireland over the past five years. Some commentators have praised these accounts for providing a voice for the ‘silent majority,’ while others have condemned what they view as their crude stereotyping of working-class loyalist communities. Yet, there remains little empirical research exploring the contribution of these accounts to political discourses. This paper sets out to address this issue by exploring the social media presence of the most prominent parody group, Loyalists Against Democracy (or LADFLEG). A thematic analysis of posts taken from its Facebook (N=35,721) and Twitter accounts (N=3,587) was conducted between December 2012 and October 2013. This covered contentious episodes such as the protests and rioting prompted by the decision to alter the protocol on the flying of the union flag over Belfast City Hall and the campaign to sack Health Minister Edwin Poots due to his refusal to overturn the ban on blood donation from gay and bisexual men. Results suggest LADFLEG used social media for a variety of purposes, ranging from the shaming of loyalists for posting offensive hate speech online to holding elected representatives to account. By October 2013 the group was playing a prominent role in factchecking politicians such as Poots and increasing the response rate for the petition to remove him from office. In this respect, LADFLEG had evolved from being an observer of contentious politics into a more active participant.

2)Reilly, P., Serafinelli, E., Petersen, L., Fallou, L. & Havarneanu, G. Terrorism, Twitter and Vernacular Creativity: #PorteOuverte and the November 2015 Paris Terror Attacks

Abstract:

Twitter has emerged as a key platform for citizens during terrorist attacks, not only as a
source of information but also as an outlet for providing support for victims. Citizen
responses to such incidents on the microblogging site often demonstrate what Burgess
(2008) refers to as ‘vernacular creativity’, with hashtags and memes used to express
solidarity with those directly affected. This paper explores one such incident, namely the
terror attacks by ISIS militants in Paris on 13 November 2015, which resulted in 130 fatalities and left several hundred wounded. The saturation of mobile phone networks left many citizens stranded and unable to tell their families and loved ones that they were safe. It was in this context that journalists such as Sylvain Lapoix urged citizens to use the hashtag#PorteOuverte if they were looking for shelter or able to offer refuge to others. This study explores the efficacy of this initiative by presenting a review of the literature on social media and disaster response, an overview of the role of Twitter during the Paris attacks, and a thematic analysis of eight interviews conducted with key stakeholders who were actively involved in the response to the atrocities. Results indicate that professional journalists played a key role in raising public awareness of #PorteOuverte and connecting people affected by the terror attacks. While the site may encourage vernacular creativity amongst citizens, the participation of public figures in these campaigns appears essential if they are to bring support to those directly affected by crises.

Presenting paper at ESRC CASCADE-NET Seminar, 1st December

This Friday (1st December) I am an invited speaker at the ESRC CASCADE-NET Seminar “The role of Civil Society’s agency in governance and contingency planning: citizenship, participation and social learning.” The seminar, organised by co-Investigator Dr. Martina McGuinness (Management School, University of Sheffield) will be held in Inox Dine, Students’ Union Building, University of Sheffield.

My paper is entitled ‘Social media, citizen empowerment and crisis communication during the 2014 UK Floods’ and draws on my recently completed EC FP7 funded research project CascEff . The slides for my presentation can be found here

 

Job: Fixed term Research Associate (closes tomorrow)

I am currently looking for a full-time Research Associate (fixed term for 5 months, to start as soon as possible with provisional end date of 30 May 2018, and probable extension to 31 August 2018) for my EC Horizon 2020 project IMPROVER: Improved risk evaluation and implementation of resilience concepts to critical infrastructure.’ The closing date for applications is tomorrow [22 November 2017] and further details on the role can be found here

If you have any questions about the role please contact me at: P.J.Reilly@sheffield.ac.uk

Research cited in UK Parliament POSTnote ‘Communicating Risk’

My CascEff research report on the role of social and traditional media in crisis communication has been cited in the UK Parliamentary Office of Science & Technology POSTnote 564: Communicating Risk. I was also one of several UK academics to be an invited reviewer of this publication. It can be downloaded here 

Job: Full-Time Research Associate (fixed term, 5 months)

I am currently looking for a full-time Research Associate (fixed term for 5 months, to start as soon as possible with provisional end date of 30 May 2018, and probable extension to 31 August 2018) for my EC Horizon 2020 project IMPROVER: Improved risk evaluation and implementation of resilience concepts to critical infrastructure.’ The closing date for applications is 22 November 2017 and further details on the role can be found here

If you have any questions about the role please contact me at: P.J.Reilly@sheffield.ac.uk

ESRC Festival of Social Science event

This morning, Dr Tina McGuinness (Management Studies) and I ran an event for local schools entitled Could social media help you during a disaster?, as part of the 2017 ESRC Festival of Social Science. The description of the event was:

Can social media help build disaster resilience in Sheffield? What role, if any, should social media users, and young people in particular, play in efforts to mitigate the effects of these incidents in their communities and help keep themselves and others safe? Recent research has suggested that social media can help emergency services during human made and natural disasters through the ‘push and pull’ of crisis information. The eyewitness perspectives shared by citizens on social media can help first responders build situational awareness and identify those areas most in need of assistance. At the same time, platforms such as Facebook and Twitter can provide emotional and material support to those affected by such incidents. For instance, during the floods in the South-West of England (December 2013-February 2014), citizen-led social media campaigns such as #forageaid helped provide support for affected communities. The latter would also lead a campaign calling on the UK government to dredge local rivers in order to avoid a repeat of these flood events. Twitter hashtags such as #roomformanchester and #wearenotafraid would also be used to provide shelter and express support for those affected by the most recent terrorist attacks in London and Manchester.

Our guest speakers were:

Dr Tina McGuinness, University of Sheffield

Alex Mills, South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service

Heather Cottrill & Derek Bell, UK Environment Agency

Thanks to Alexandra Ricketts and Rebecca Stevenson for assisting with the event and to the students for their participation at what was a very enjoyable event!

Some pictures from the event are below, for further information please see my Storify .

 

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Dr Tina McGuinness presenting her research on social media and flood events

 

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Alex Mills presenting an overview of how SYFR use social media 

 

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Heather Cottrill discusses how the UK Environment Agency has used social media in South Yorkshire

Appointed Associate Editor, Palgrave Communications

I am pleased to say that I have been appointed Associate Editor for Palgrave Communications,  a fully open-access, online journal publishing peer-reviewed academic research across the full spectrum of the humanities and social science. I will be working with colleagues within the Editorial Boards for Communication, Film, Culture & Media, and Political Science and International Relations.

I look forward to sharing further updates on this work in due course.

Job: Full-Time Research Associate (fixed term)

I am currently looking for a full-time Research Associate (fixed term for 5 months, to start as soon as possible with provisional end date of 30 May 2018, and probable extension to 31 August 2018) for my EC Horizon 2020 project IMPROVER: Improved risk evaluation and implementation of resilience concepts to critical infrastructure.’ The closing date for applications is 22 November 2017 and further details on the role can be found here

If you have any questions about the role please contact me at: P.J.Reilly@sheffield.ac.uk

Recognised as Dedicated Outstanding Mentor

I am delighted to report that I have been recognised as a Dedicated Outstanding Mentor by the University of Sheffield’s Research and Innovation Services. One of my mentee (very kindly!) wrote this about my mentoring skills:

It made me reflect on my options and I feel that now I have agreed formal timelines, I am more likely to action my ambition to be a P.I on a project, sooner. I think it is reasonable to say that I would have applied to be a P.I at some point, but feel the support has really pushed me on, and also helped me realise that there are other options open to me.”

Thanks to all of my mentees and Dr. Kay Guccione (who leads the Research Staff Mentoring Scheme) for their very positive feedback and support- very much appreciated!